Scientists discover a new blue

Discovered: The first new blue pigment in 200 years

Scientists discover a new blue, by accident of course, as is often the way with scientific discoveries. The color was discovered by chance by a group of Oregon State University chemists who were heating up chemicals to find new materials for electronics. They named it  YinMn (pronounced “yin-min”) which stands for the elements it’s made of: yitrium iridium, manganese, and oxygen.

 

They continue to search for a new stable, heat reflecting brilliant red, the most elusive color to synthesize.

 

At Laboratory5 Inc. We bring together all elements of STEAM and tie them up into a package to promote the work each individual is doing in their fields to celebrate this work. We produce experiences so that those unfamiliar with the glorious, quirky, nerdy qualities of all areas of STEAM can be explored as an adventure to explain these fields.

Laboratory5 Inc. is a small business based in Tempe, Arizona

Visit our website: Laboratory5       Follow us on Twitter: @lab5     Become a fan on Facebook: Laboratory5
Contact Us at any time – we’d love to hear from you

Biomimicry Challenge For Artists

Biomimicry Challenge For Artists

screen-shot-2016-11-22-at-3-32-03-pm

If you are an Arizona artist who is interested in bringing nature’s genius to your project work and innovation strategies then you must apply for this opportunity.  You will have the opportunity to work with scientists in any field that will advance your practice. We will pair you up! Is your artwork inspired by nature/life sciences? Then this artist residency may be right for you! You will work with Cyndi Coon of Laboratory5 Inc. As the City of Tempe S.T.E.A.M consultant and residency lead,  she will guide you and push you, in your practice to create new, innovative works during this 10 week residency.

screen-shot-2016-11-22-at-3-26-50-pm

Gallery at Tempe Center for the Arts Tempe, Arizona 

Summer Artist Residency: Biomimicry Challenge

Deadline:  Jan. 20, 2017 | 5 p.m. | Free Application

What is Biomimicry? 
Biomimicry is an exciting field that seeks to emulate nature to create sustainable solutions to human problems. Today, it is used by professionals such as scientists, engineers, architects, designers and business people to create things like new and/or improved products, manufacturing processes and design standards. Well known examples of biomimicry include Velcro (inspired by plant burr hooks) and solar cells (inspired by photosynthesizing plants). For more information about biomimicry, go to biomimicry.asu.edu

The Gallery at Tempe Center for the Arts sponsored by Northern Trust is collaborating with the Biomimicry Center and LeRoy Erying Center for Solid State Science at Arizona State University to coordinate a summer 2017 exhibition that explores biomimicry solutions and nature-inspired contemporary art.


About the Artist Residency
Arizona-based visual artists may apply for use of one of three studio spaces inside the Gallery for ten weeks (May 19-July 28) during the exhibition. Artists will be selected by a jury panel. Selected artists will be eligible for a stipend.


About the Challenge:
We are challenging artists to think beyond creating work that is inspired by nature. We are looking for proposals that “emulate nature to solve human challenges.” During the residency, artists will work in the Gallery studio to create a new single artwork, a series of artworks and/or a site specific installation. Visitors will be able to watch the progression of artworks throughout the summer.

How Do I Apply?

  1. Please read the residency description
  2. Please read the residency guidelines
  3. Complete the application form. Instructions for submission are located on the form.

For more information/questions, contact Michelle Dock, Gallery at TCA Coordinator, (480) 350-2867 or michelle_dock@tempe.gov

 

 

Visit our website: Laboratory5       Follow us on Twitter: @lab5     Become a fan on Facebook: Laboratory5
Contact Us at anytime – we’d love to hear from you

top-logo-image

 

Ladies Talk (and draw) Science

bab3f3e147d2b6e6a81a42a42f0bb75b

Ernst Haeckel Diatoms

Friday July 22 | S.T.E.A.M.-Y Ladies Night Out

with artist Cyndi Coon and scientist Catherine Seiler

Did you know that people aren’t the only things that like “selfies?” Inspired by the work of artist Ernst Haeckel, this hands-on workshop includes down-to earth science talk about diatoms and the opportunity to draw your own mini “Cellfies.” It will be like taking a snap shot of your own cells!

Coon is the Chief Experience Officer and President of Laboratory5 Inc. and Seiler is a Program Manager at the Biobank Core Facility at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center.

STEAMY logo pic

 

This workshop is Free and takes place in the TCA Gallery from 6-8 p.m.

Location: 700 W. Rio Salado Parkway Tempe, AZ 85281 
Free parking is available for this event at the Tempe Center for the Arts.

Get outdoors and into water

There are so many ways to play outside – don’t forget about ideas on water.

All outdoor water activities offer a great opportunity to talk with kids about the importance of our water and oceans. Take a look at this infographic from NOAA the National Ocean Service Association.

our-ocean

Sometimes it’s as simple as a dip in a pool or a day at the beach.

20140810_132120

ocean play

Other water activities can require a bit more work such as river canoeing or ocean paddle boarding but it is so worth it to get kids connected with all forms of nature.

20140719_173226

 

Visit our website: Laboratory5       Follow us on Twitter: @lab5     Become a fan on Facebook: Laboratory5
Contact Us at anytime – we’d love to hear from you

 

Summer Solstice

CELEBRATE SUMMER SOLSTICE

Celebrating Summer Solstice is a great way to connect kids with nature as Solstice highlights the transitions in nature. Crops are starting to grow, daylight is at its peak and the weather in most locations is inviting.

June Solstice: Longest and Shortest Day of the Year

Illustration image

 

Solstice is Monday, June 20, 2016 

A solstice happens when the sun’s zenith is at its furthest point from the equator. On the June solstice, it reaches its northernmost point and the Earth’s North Pole tilts directly towards the sun, at about 23.4 degrees. It’s also known as the northern solstice because it occurs when the sun is directly over the Tropic of Cancer in the Northern Hemisphere.

Meaning of Solstice

‘Solstice’ (Latin: ‘solstitium’) means ‘sun-stopping’. The point on the horizon where the sun appears to rise and set, stops and reverses direction after this day. On the solstice, the sun does not rise precisely in the east, but rises to the north of east and sets to the north of west, meaning it’s visible in the sky for a longer period of time.

Although the June solstice marks the first day of astronomical summer, it’s more common to use meteorological definitions of seasons, making the solstice midsummer.

Illustration image

Stonehenge in England. ©bigstockphoto.com/dubassy

Ideas to celebrate the MidSummer Solstice:

Eat local and seasonal foods – Visit a farmers market

Pick fresh flowers  – Swedish legend has it that if you pick seven kinds of flowers and put them under your pillow on Midsummer Eve, you will have wonderful dreams.

Have a Bonfire – According to old pagan traditions, the bonfires would to scare off witches and other evil creatures during the Solstice.

Learn more about Phenology – the study of cyclic and seasonal natural phenomena, especially in relation to climate and plant and animal life.

 

Natural Playgrounds

Why have kids play and explore in nature? Because they already know what to do there – not instructions required. Kids are hard wired to know how to play outside, it is only we adults who interrupt their potential while they are explore. We do this out of our own fears but what if we allow these young explores to take over and investigate all on their own? Just think of what they might come up with. Beyond playing out in a natural environment what if you are interested in building a playground in the back yard for the kids? consider building one out of natural materials. You can keep it simple and put up a few tree stumps to offer space for imaginative play.

6a00e55397a5c288340134896c57d4970c-pi

 

You could create structures that are more complex and offer a fort like set ups so kids feel like they are in their own land and are able to invent new games with new rules. They can build characters and use their imaginations to create whole new worlds.

Kagome-PPAG-Architects-3

 

Mix nature with richer character development and storytelling by creating an outdoor structure that is a puppet theater combined with a beverage stand or Lucy from Peanut’s Advise stall. Let kids decide how they want to incorporate nature into the story they tell and how they see the world.

1571487b968187b66c5ac7a0add8065b

 

Next time you think “should I let the kids play an hour more on their tech or should I take them to a nearby playground?” consider how healthy it is for kids to have unsupervised, creative outdoor play. Leave them alone because they know what to do out there, just like you did when you where a kid.

Outdoor_Play_Infographic

Visit our website: Laboratory5       Follow us on Twitter: @lab5     Become a fan on Facebook: Laboratory5
Contact Us at anytime – we’d love to hear from you

Build Outside – Miniatures

Every summer we go camping and spend days, weeks and even months outside playing in nature. And every summer my girls and their friends build outdoor habitats for the magical, mysterious creatures known as fairies.

JAJR3BXmMq_8ZoVhi1yvZ0wC1qkiOrYsZRb17wq1bajSSZCGTjor0wumVErQS5eZWqfovnMgF5M6ukPpzITnyomxY9VBKrLbv8WU9sV8CnGqsw-SrFOOeYCR2cnhsZllWtfgCK0HPD86_8KuCPPXddkdO0_--B47Y_9AGybG9rcU5mwdYQt3OZ3oRD0vNamdlCzKHSMe43Fln8t_frBUKDTBMJTkD

We encourage  magic and mystery with the kids while they are in their natural surroundings. Imaginative play through constructing outdoor fairy houses from natural materials such as bark, sticks, stones, flowers, grasses, acorns and pine cones; along with small pieces of trash they find around the camp site like bottle caps, broken sunglasses, pieces of plastic. We use this collection time to have conversations with our mini architects to talk about preserving nature and not littering. We talk about how harmful it is to birds and water life when people don’t properly dispose of their garbage.

jX5sPT8LCpt0AkG8pvJ7FhyTq-QqHW9ShvM-NnBVs8Tv49NLzFQvly2FDtmYI7yU3ciSxvLnftEavy1UX6FLnpIoGZmKsCmaszqM9k8sJ4ecF1hZHUaka0vW46Mwte1ZzaXsKh8IUR1R0AVVNalQnwLDp_w2eP0lyRKOmgzh-_4KecW7z340KS_bBGNSEXKUtX9qISNTcfjZtn_whQvpNGauDZ4UO

 

When  building a fairy house think about all of the possibilities: such as creating a pebble path, making a fence out of sticks, a walnut-shell bathtub,  leaf hammock, a bark bed or a stone table.

xpAZYS_vpJxqAYRGSHBP8BFTFBSTTUO1id1ipnGhRvntErjBiotl8SROCeMOtPkAjUzNOOmF0CnwYYCfyvpfwBpGn7B1Gf09dsN_rzlGApEPrn8qDkJeTm2QDXSpp_eD8Bx216UavYJ3LNVDFLqy83d5wjlyhlGJl-4fUnKr2LeN-dXb5_R5kLh_QN_q27NCphn1VuF5B91K7GKXcNphqO80WleHE

 

You can do this in your own back yard, at a playground or even in a container filled with dirt on a balcony of an apartment. You need only to get outside, take a walk, carry a bag or a bucket and collect things. Bring back the found goodies to the place you will construct and begin the process to create a welcoming home for fairies.

Want more ideas? Check out these books – they are some of our favorites:

615OfqZ1H9L._SX258_BO1,204,203,200_

Fairy House: How to Make Amazing Fairy Furniture, Miniatures, and More from Natural Materials

Screen Shot 2016-05-10 at 12.38.43 PMFairies: Real Encounters With Little People

Visit our website: Laboratory5       Follow us on Twitter: @lab5     Become a fan on Facebook: Laboratory5
Contact Us at anytime – we’d love to hear from you